Archive for the ‘jury selection’ Category

In trial and on the net: how trial lawyers use the web

Tuesday, August 19th, 2008

Good article here on a growing practice. Trial lawyers use the internet to find out background on potential witnesses, potential parties, and even potential jurors. This includes social networking sites to find out what the real story is on someone involved in a case. The article raises questions about whether it’s ethical to dig into potential jurors’ internet postings. Assuming there’s no hacking involved, I don’t see any problem finding out as much as I can about a potential witness or juror.

I can learn a lot more about a person from reading her MySpace page than I can from the stifling and artificial question and answer session of jury selection that goes on in the courtroom.

The interesting part from the perspective of those of us in the trenches is the time clash.  Depending on the local rules, trial lawyers frequently don’t get names of prospective jurors until the beginning of jury selection. And often those are called out orally in open court, and you’re scrambling to record the name. Then, you might little or no time to question prospective jurors before deciding on whether to challenge or strike a potential juror. It’s that short window of time that is the most important to look for background.

Imagine that there are maybe 30-50 potential jurors being interviewed with decisions to be made in a matter of hours, sometimes less. The bottom line is that it’s very hard to do effective background searches under these conditions. Even so, we all try because a toxic juror who does not disclose bias in jury selection can unfairly destroy a case.

David Sugerman